• The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

    The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

    A national platform in brain research

  • The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

    The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

    A national lab to conduct first rate, cutting-edge research in brain and cognitive sciences in the world

Seminar
Title: The Integrative Self
Speaker: Professor Glyn Humphreys, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
Date & Time : 24th Jun 2015 (Wednesday), 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Venue: Seminar Room 4, 4F, Hong Kong Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, HKU

About the speaker
Glyn Humphreys is Watts professor and Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University. He has published over 600 articles in leading international journals and 16 books. He has been awarded the Spearman Medal, The President’s Award and the Cognitive Psychology Prize from the British Psychological Society, the Freda Newcombe Prize from the British Neuropsychological Society and the Donald Broadbent Award from the European Society for Cognitive Psychology.He has been President of both the Experimental Psychology Society and the British Neuropsychological Society. He is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences and the British Academy. 

 

Abstract:
Understanding the self has long been an ambition in psychology but progress has relied on the use of self-report measures which are open to bias and demand characteristics in experiments. Here I will review studies from my laboratory over the past 5 years that have attempted to measure characteristics of the self through self-related biases on perception and memory, and that set-out the relations between the self and other motivational drivers including reward and emotion. In these studies participants form associations between personal labels and simple stimuli and show a massive bias to stimuli associated with the self. These biases emerge on perception and memory and can be shown to reflect enhanced binding of stimuli. The effects are also distinct from the effects of reward and emotion, both functionally and at a neural level. The implications for understanding what the self ‘does for us’ will be discussed.   

ALL ARE WELCOME !  

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